Hippy: Hip Impingement Surgery

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Hippy: Hip Impingement aka Femero-Acetabular Impingement — FAI for short… and OUCH for real
Hip Impingment Surgery coming up soon. Thought I’d share a bit about the preplanning. It is taking a lot of time to coordinate post op in home survival. It is reminding me of just how good I am at coordinating and project managing, but it’s also making me over work this probably simple situation.

But first — anyone considering surgery must remember to ask the right questions. Don’t assume anything. There comes a time when you finally ask the right questions. And I finally did.
The right question in any Doctor’s office – especially in a surgeons – is simple:
“What are my other options? ”  and if they say surgery —
always ask: “Is there any other non-invasive option?”

I so wish I’d asked that a year ago.

Hip injuries really damage the quality of life. It’s not supposed to happen this young, we say. We’ve taken great care of ourselves, tried to eat well, tried to exercise — and still.. things happen. We can work it out on our own – just massage, exercise and take it easy for a while. But when that doesn’t help, you know there’s an issue bigger than you thought. After 6 months of self management, I saw a PT for 9 months. By that time, I could barely walk. The more I did the worse I got.

Facing Hip Surgery and it’s so complicated. Crutches, stairs, and oh dear… Here’s my strategy. Things must be thought through before hand. With a disabled spouse, it’s essential that I create a few plans. I keep saying things like:

This Hippy (that’s what they call us) is not so happy about surgery.
But she’s got a plan. It’s a good plan. Maybe it’s a great plan. But it requires help. And asking for help is not easy. And it’s kind of funny how much I find online that is different than the doctor’s office recommendations. Rick’s doc would call them medical profiteers — they are selling stuff to make money. Caveat Emptor: Let the Buyer Beware. (Might consider a website dedicated to selling stuff to help)

What I’m finding is I need a balance of tools to help compared to what the doctor says I really need. I saved over $300 by not buying stuff that others wrote about on their hippy experience.

So here’s the plan:
Eat clean prior to surgery, ensuring I eat uplifting foods and eat a rainbow of colors while getting the best nutrients.
Hydrate
Organize a space to hang out in the house.
Tested crutches and found better padding options to avoid pressure point pain.

And a pretty, matching Crutcheze carry case that attaches to the crutches:

And if these things aren’t enough to help, I have plenty of backpacks I can use to haul stuff around the house.
Like the ice pack I’ll need. I found this brand works the best. The cold stays cold, it’s super flexible, and there is little risk of tearing. And if I use my laptop backpack, I can carry it from freezer to my spot on the couch.

The bigger dilemma will be food preparation and self-care.
Cook a bunch of meals and put in the freezer.
Do a Costco Run and buy all kinds of good things to freeze or have in pantry.
Stock up on staples and sundries.
Enlist help from friends to check on me, check on hubby, help with household stuff.

Drink lot’s of liquids: Water, Fresh Juice with lot’s of “mean green”  and Bone Broth all fresh made.
Take the right supplements: Immune support, Holy Basil Plus, Calcium, D3, and a multi
Make sure I eat lots of fibrous foods and get enough protein

Move! The doc’s office says they want me to move. They don’t want me sitting around.

Probably get a massage or two.

The big concern right now is how to help my disabled hubby get through this without crashing. He can’t do a fraction of what he wants to do on a good day. He’s not used to needing to help me. I fear the stress will be too much and I have no idea what to do about it.

They don’t teach this in business school. They don’t teach this in post grad school either. Somehow, either you think like a project manager or you don’t. I’ve got that ingrained in me. Drive people nuts when I think things through, but not much falls through the cracks. Thanks to Terry Umbreit, who taught us well.